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Here's What You Need to Know About Sea Turtle Nesting Season

Kelly Sloan is Coastal Wildlife Director at the Sanibel-Captiva Conservation Foundation. She is monitoring a new sea turtle nest on the beach.
Shane Antalick
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Kelly Sloan is Coastal Wildlife Director at the Sanibel-Captiva Conservation Foundation. She is monitoring a new sea turtle nest on the beach.

If they survive, baby sea turtles born along Southwest Florida’s coast will spend 20 to 30 years exploring the oceans before returning to where they first hatched to reproduce for the very first time. The most common sea turtles to nest in this part of the state are Loggerheads, but Leatherbacks and endangered Green and Kemp’s Ridley sea turtles sometimes nest here.

Sea turtle nesting season runs from April 15 through October 31 in Southwest Florida, which means it’s beginning to wind down. We get an update on how this season has gone from members of the Sanibel-Captiva Conservation Foundation’s Sea Turtle Program and learn about their volunteer-driven monitoring efforts, which have been ongoing since the 1950s.

To report any issues with nests, nesting turtles, or hatchlings, please call the Sea Turtle Hotline: 978-728-3663

GUESTS:

  • Kelly Sloan, Coastal Wildlife Director at the Sanibel-Captiva Conservation Foundation (SCCF)
  • Jack Brzoza, SCCF Biologist
  • Andrew Glinsky, SCCF Research Associate
  • Cheri Hollis, SCCF Volunteer
Jack Measurements on Cookies 7 Cream .jpg
SHANE ANTALICK
Jack Brzoza, Sanibel-Captiva Conservation Foundation (SCCF) biologist, measures a sea turtle on the beach. Since 2016, SCCF has conducted night surveys from May 1 through August 1 of each year. The goal of this project is to encounter, tag, and measure as many sea turtles as possible. There is an outreach component as staff routinely interacts with beachgoers to explain how both sea turtles and humans can safely share Sanibel’s beaches at night.