Water

New research shows pollution in the Gulf of Mexico is coming from a source close to home: our closets. A team of scientists say plastic microfibers in polyester, nylon and acrylics are washing out of household fabrics and into the ocean.

VISIT FLORIDA via Flickr

A third of Floridians get drinking water from the Everglades. But it’s becoming harder for the Everglades to keep that water clean. Lawmakers in Tallahassee have a plan that could help. You’ll hear more about that later this week. But first, Kate Stein explains how the Everglades used to work.

U.S. Sugar Corp. says it would honor a previous agreement putting land south of Lake Okeechobee toward Everglades restoration.

U.S. Sugar staunchly has opposed a reservoir on the land, aimed at improving water flow after toxic algae blooms last year prompted emergency declarations in four counties.

But spokeswoman Judy Sanchez says if the Legislature approves the plan the company would honor a previous agreement authorizing the state to buy 153,000 acres.

Mary Ann Martin motors the trails carved among the grassy bulrushes rimming Lake Okeechobee, emerging on a watery expanse that ends where blue meets blue at the horizon.

"This is the Big O. Isn't it beautiful? Blows your mind. You can't see hardly across the lake."

She cuts the pontoon boat's engine. In the distance anglers fish for bass, catfish and crappie. Cormorants and pelicans take flight from a small island, their wings beating the water's surface.

A proposal to build a water storage reservoir south of Lake Okeechobee could create more than 39,000 jobs, according to a study released Tuesday by the Everglades Foundation.

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