HIV/AIDS

In a case stemming from a law that requires HIV-infected people to inform potential sexual partners about the disease, the Florida Supreme Court this week said a legal definition of

Photo: National Eye Institute via Wikimedia Commons

New estimates through mid-2016 show Florida's surge in syphilis cases continued last year, with cases of infectious syphilis jumping statewide by 36 percent by the middle the middle of year.

Syphilis in Florida grew by a shocking 72.8 percent from 2010 through 2014, and continued to grow by nearly 20 percent the following year. In some parts of South Florida, the rate of infection per 100,000 people is greater than in major cities like Los Angeles. Southwest Florida counties like Lee and Sarasota saw small numbers of the disease triple or quadruple during that six-month period.

Jessica Meszaros, WGCU-FM

The Laboratory Theater of Florida ends it’s run of the 2014 Tony-nominated Broadway play “Mothers and Sons,” by Terrence McNally, this weekend.  The production tells the story of a woman who visits her late son’s former partner. Her son died from AIDS decades ago. The play’s broader themes of forgiveness and reconciliation are universal, but the backdrop of the fight for LGBT acceptance and the AIDS crisis hit close to home in Florida which the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention ranks number one in the nation when it comes to new rates of HIV infection.  Local experts led an interactive audience ‘talk back’ after the Jan. 12 performance.


Photo: National Eye Institute via Wikimedia Commons

New data on HIV/AIDS cases from the Center for Disease Control paint an alarming picture of the disease spreading in South Florida. Cities like Miami report triple the national rate for new HIV infections in 2015, while smaller cities in Southwest Florida continue to show some of the highest number of cases per capita in the nation.

The Florida Department of Health says its dramatic drop in the number of new cases of HIV can be attributed to duplicate cases and changes to the way they are counted, the Tampa Bay Times reports.

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